Writer’s block illustrated

“A dubious writer struggles to come up with a storyline, but finds that his imagination gets out of hand.” That’s the introduction to the six-minute short film “Writer’s Block” by Robby Spark.

A writer finds inspiration everywhere, right? That’s what our guy in the film hopes for. From his café table, he sees a car with a “Pirate Pizza” sign on the door and on he goes with a story about two pirates dueling on the beach. Day and night and day and night and… until he hits the Delete button. Then he is inspired by a couple in love a few tables away and starts afresh with two lovers gazing at each other and enjoying a meal underneath the starry sky. Suddenly they are attacked by ninjas. Delete. In the end, all the characters, the dueling pirates, the couple in love, the ninjas plus a dozen others, end up on the same beach and the chaos is complete.

If you ever wondered how it looks like inside the head of a writer who tries to come up with a storyline, this is it.

 
WordPress Daily Prompts: Dubious, Bewildered

Waiting for inspiration

“Inspiration is for amateurs. The rest of us just show up and get to work.” Painter Chuck Close said that. Writing breeds inspiration. So when we run out of inspiration or motivation or maybe just procrastinate, we should hit the keyboard and compose one word at a time to get the engine going. Because writing is our job. Pilots fly their planes from here to there, surgeons operate one patient at a time. It’s their job. We don’t see doctors just standing there waiting for inspiration, or a plane stuck on the runway because of a pilot’s block. Although there is no “one right way” to write, some goals and regularity benefit the creative flow. Write from here to there, be it half an hour or 2 hours or 500 words a day — or a blog post of 149 words about waiting for inspiration, while amateurishly waiting for inspiration.

Inspiration is for amateurs. The rest of us just show up and get to work. If you wait around for the clouds to part and a bolt of lightning to strike you in the brain, you are not going to make an awful lot of work. All the best ideas come out of the process; they come out of the work itself.
— Chuck Close, from “Wisdom: The Greatest Gift One Generation Can Give To Another” by Andrew Zuckerman

 
WordPress Daily Prompts: One-way