The power of the word

Words matter immensely. My philosophy is that they have been traveling alongside us since the dawn of the human race, telling our history. They have inspired writers, been meticulously stated in ink: guilty or not guilty, been used in declarations of war and peace: hate you, love you. They can entertain, inform, and make power-hungry small minds tremble. Through our pens, they pass on the stories of the past, comment on the times in which we live, and leave a mark for tomorrow. If we fail to catch the words as they pass by, they quickly fade away and move on, from writer to writer, always traveling.

Meanwhile, somewhere else, a writer is staring at a blank screen…

For of all sad words of tongue or pen,
The saddest are these: “It might have been!”
— John Greenleaf Whittier, “Maud Muller”

When words take flight

That feeling when seemingly out of nothing, the words emerge, one after another to form a sentence, a paragraph, a scene, a story… Slowly at first, then the pace quickens until it seems like the story is writing itself, as if you are just a transcriber of events. A city rises in front of you, fills with people and life, it’s the future or the 1960’s or a world war trench. Then the specifics, a yellow dress, red lips, and a gallant lift of the hat as the two meet. If you ever invented a world that didn’t exist until you wrote it into life, then you know what I’m talking about.

Facts will never move the human heart like storytelling can. Highly creative people, especially artists, know this and weave stories into everything they do. It takes longer for them to explain something, explaining isn’t the point. The experience is.
— Kevin Kaiser, 20 Things Only Highly Creative People Would Understand

Waiting for inspiration

Amateur writers wait for inspiration, others just go to work. A king on writing said that. Writing breeds inspiration. So when we run out of inspiration or motivation or maybe just procrastinate, we should hit the keyboard and compose one word at a time to get the engine going. Because writing is our job. Pilots fly their planes from here to there, surgeons operate one patient at a time. It’s their job. We don’t see doctors just standing there waiting for inspiration, or a plane stuck on the runway because of a pilot’s block. Some goals and regularity benefit the creative flow. Write from here to there, 2 hours or 500 words a day — or a blog post of 130 words about waiting for inspiration, while amateurishly waiting for inspiration.

Amateurs sit and wait for inspiration, the rest of us just get up and go to work.
— Stephen King allegedly said that, but not in “On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft” as many seem to think.