Putting on my reading socks

 
It’s not like the word flow is stifled or anything ― I checked ― it’s just another lazy blogging day, better suited for reading.

readingsocks
I bought a pair of reading socks from a bookstore, maybe a little bit too big. My feet look like hobbit feet. The book is “Norse Mythology” by Neil Gaiman. I love the dedication to his grandson: “For Everett. Old stories for a new boy.” 

 
WordPress Daily Prompt: Stifle

10 short-short stories

Brighten your horizon with a short story, “a perfect companion to a cup of coffee,” to quote myself from another post. Here are ten short stories to take you into the weekend, and maybe give you the inspiration to write your own stories and submit them to the many short story sites out there:

Bed Hole Syndrome, by Carla Lancken: “The day I was fired I came home, undressed, and went to bed for five years.”

First Flight, by Bobby Warner: “Folks called her Old Witch, and she was Timmy’s friend. … ‘Would you like to fly?’ she asked.”

The Postcard, by Arleane Ralph: “Contractors discovered the postcard upon pulling out the kitchen cabinetry.”

Painting the Sea, by Conor Kelly: “My father paints the sea. That is how I remember him.”

I’m With the Band, by David Cook: “The drummer battered away at his kit with venomous incompetence…”

The Painter’s Wife, by Brian Castleberry: “The poet had been sleeping with the painter’s wife for three months…”

A Royal Feast (aka Eat Your Vegetables), by Iain Kelly: “Gefjun brought the feast to the table. Her husband, Skjöldr, son of Odin, sat silently in his anger.”

Sky Love, by Emily Manno: “What a magnificent thing, to fly in the clouds.”

That Girl, by Heather Beecher Hawk: “My first real boyfriend, Alan … he asked me to meet his family…”

Required Summer Reading, by Kimberly Tolson: “My grandma kept her pocket paperback romance novels in the scary spare room…”

 
WordPress Daily Prompt: Horizon

 
Photo: ismagilov/iStock.com

A giant leap: Cracking the reading code

Do you remember the moment when you cracked the reading code? I do.

I was five when I finally figured out what the words in the books said. I remember how frustrated I had been because I knew all the letters but I couldn’t combine them into words.

One day I made an extra effort and read each letter in a story slowly, pronouncing them and trying to put them together: a-a-a l-l-l… Then, all the sudden, the door flung open, letters formed into words, words formed into stories. You know how it is when the fog lifts and you suddenly see the vast landscape around you, or when you draw back the curtains in the morning to have a first look over a new city you arrived at only the night before… that’s how it felt, looking back.

It was a life-changing moment. I became literate from one second to the next, literally. One instant I was just an ordinary earthly child, the next an explorer in a new world that opened up before me. I know exactly what Neil Armstrong must have felt the moment he put his foot on the lunar surface. A giant leap. Nothing less.

Not that I reflected on it at the time. I did not cheer, I did not even bother to tell anyone about my new-found skills. I just felt a silent satisfaction and thought, “Finally. About time.”

The first thing I read was a Donald Duck magazine. I lay flat on my back.

The sheer joy of reading! Every child has the right to experience that sensation.
— Zol H.

WordPress Daily Prompts: Neophyte